Join us for the 2019 Washington Bike Summit

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Don’t miss this opportunity to connect with bicycling advocates, planning professionals, and legislators during the 2019 legislative session in Olympia, WA.

The Washington Bike Summit, including all panel sessions, breakfast, and lunch, will be held at Hotel RL in Olympia (2300 Evergreen Park Dr SW).

2019 Washington Bike Summit
You can now check out all of our guest speakers. For all details related to the Washington Bike Summit, go to cascade.org/summit.

Rooms are going fast for the legislative session.  Book your hotel now!  To get specials rates at Hotel RL for attending the Washington Bike Summit, call calling Donielle Vanderlip at 360.252.0984.

Early bird registration is now open!  Registration cannot be purchased on-site, so now is the best time to book!

Early Bird Registration (Now until January 31, 2019)
$200 Both Days //  $115 One Day

Late Registration  (February 1, 2019 – February 7, 2019)
$250 Both Days  // $145 One Day

Scholarships
As a non-profit organization, we work to broaden the inclusion of voices and perspectives at the conference for the benefit of all participants. If you need help to defer the costs of registration, then consider applying for a scholarship!

You must have a cascade.org account to register or apply for a scholarship (it’s easy and it’s free!).

See you in Olympia!

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A ‘yes’ for King County Prop 1 is a vote for a connected regional trail network

woman and girl biking on a trail

Check your mail: your ballot has arrived for the August 6 primary! This year, a critical levy is on the ballot in King County to improve parks, trails, and open space. Washington Bikes recommends voting yes on King County Prop 1. Take the pledge now and let us know you will be voting yes for trails!

I pledge to vote YES on Prop 1!

People who bike, walk, and roll our region’s trails today know that the number one issue for trails is that there simply aren’t enough of them. Prop 1 includes significant funding to grow and fill gaps in our regional trails network, in addition to other benefits for the zoo, aquarium, and land conservation. Washington Bikes and our affiliate, Cascade Bicycle Club, have both endorsed Prop 1 because of the scale of investment in trails – including several long-standing priorities.

Five Reasons to Vote YES on Prop 1 (in no particular order)

  • Connects Woodinville to Renton on the Eastrail (formerly Eastside Rail Corridor)

The Eastrail promises game-changing connectivity between five of the Eastside’s major fast-growing cities. This levy moves us closer towards connecting King County’s portion of the 42-mile Eastrail, and makes the timely investment to ensure people have more ways to enjoy the outdoors, get to school, work or access light rail. Let’s connect the Eastrail!

  • Completes the long-awaited East Lake Sammamish Trail

Prop 1 enables the construction of the final segment of the East Lake Sammamish Trail, a connection two decades in the making. Connecting Issaquah and Redmond, the East Lake Sammamish Trail is a key link so that people biking will be able to travel all the way from the start of the Burke-Gilman Trail in Seattle to the foothills of the Cascades on a fully-paved network of connected, convenient, and safe regional trails.

  • Connects South King County by bike via the Lake to Sound Trail

The Lake to Sound Trail will connect five cities in South King County, from Lake Washington in Renton to the shores of Puget Sound in Des Moines. Prop 1 fills gaps between existing segments of the trail to connect Renton, Tukwila, Burien, Normandy Park, and Des Moines by trail. Intersecting with four other regional trails, the Lake to Sound Trail marks important progress to connect South King County by bike.

  • Grows local dollars for local investments: $60 million for King County cities

If you live in a city in King County, you stand to benefit twice from Prop 1. In addition to new trail connections, Prop 1 creates a competitive county-wide grant program for cities to fund local trail connections and other recreation opportunities.

The growing Community Partnerships and Grants Program enables community groups from across the county to engage meaningfully in trail planning. By addressing equity, we’re excited to see how this program will help realize King County’s Race and Social Justice Initiative.

Take the pledge to vote yes for trails:

I’ll vote yes for Prop 1!

Need to register to vote or update your address on your current voter registration? Click this link — you have until July 29 to do so!

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Your bike-friendly champions!

Washington Bikes is pleased to announce it’s slate of early endorsements; these are elected officials who’ve been leading the way to create communities that embrace safe, easy to access places for people to bike and walk, knowing that the benefits are many. The Washington Bikes endorsement speaks to thousands of engaged Washingtonians statewide who care about a range of issues. From wanting more connected trails, to safer neighborhood streets, to more opportunities for physical activity, Washingtonians are looking for leaders who will advance these priorities.

Washington Bikes works to secure funding for bicycle infrastructure and policies that increase access and safety. To make that happen, it matters who Washington’s elected leaders are. Please read on to learn more about the Washington Bikes’ early endorsements. Washington Bikes will make endorsements in the general election as well.

Washington Bikes 2019 early endorsement recommendations:

Claudia BalducciClaudia Balducci
King County Councilmember, District 6
https://www.claudiabalducci.com/

As the chair of the Budget and Fiscal Management Committee, which oversees infrastructure funding including the King County Parks, Trails, and Open Space Replacement Levy, Councilmember Balducci has worked to ensure active transportation infrastructure is built throughout King County.

In particular, Councilmember Balducci has championed the Eastside Rail Corridor. As co-chair of the Eastside Rail Corridor’s Regional Advisory Council, Councilmember Balducci has worked to prioritize connectivity, advance equity, and develop a cohesive brand identity for the corridor to ensure a consistent user experience.

As a Sound Transit board member, Councilmember Balducci has advocated for System Access funding in ST3 and other measures to improve first/last mile transit connections by bike.

 

John Stokes

John Stokes
Bellevue City Councilmember, Position 1
http://johnstokes.org/

Councilmember Stokes has been a big proponent of the Eastside Rail Corridor and demonstrated conviction around developing the Bellevue Bike Network, Eastside Rail Corridor, and the Grand Connection. His voting record is consistent with these priorities.

As a member of the Eastside Rail Corridor Regional Advisory Council, he’s an engaged champion of this regionally significant multi-use trail.

 

Janice Zahn

Janice Zahn
Bellevue City Councilmember, Position 5
http://www.janicezahn.org/

Councilmember Zahn is a vocal champion of biking as a safe and accessible transportation option. She has articulated support for bikeshare and Vision Zero. Her voting record is consistent with these priorities, and she’s been an effective voice on council for the potential of biking in Bellevue.

Councilmember Zahn recently brought the conversation to Bellevue around how the new statewide Vulnerable User/Safe Passing law affects Bellevue, and is supportive of full buildout of the Bellevue Bike Network. 

 

Breean Beggs

Breean Beggs
Spokane City Councilmember, Council President
https://www.electbeggs.com/

As the chair of the Spokane City Council Public Infrastructure and Environmental Sustainability Committee, which oversees construction of streets and other large infrastructure projects, Councilmember Beggs has worked to ensure active transportation projects are part of new infrastructure built throughout Spokane.

Councilmember Beggs led efforts to substantially increase funding for construction of new sidewalks, paving unpaved streets and additional traffic calming projects throughout the city. Additionally, he’s been supportive supportive of a direct, connected and safe bicycle route coming off of the new University District bicycle and pedestrian bridge, connecting people who walk and bike to one of the city’s economic districts. Councilmember Beggs helped broker a compromise that will lead to the development of a trail.

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Bringing ped and bike interests together in Olympia to get to Target Zero

It’s going to take work on multiple fronts to eliminate deaths and serious injuries to people walking and biking in Washington state. But, by working together we can achieve more, faster. That’s why, this year in Olympia, we championed legislation to merge two separate safety advisory committees – and to empower that group to identify weaknesses in the transportation system that impact people walking and biking, and recommend solutions until we reach #TargetZero. 

The newly created Cooper Jones Active Transportation Safety Advisory Council (ATSAC) will begin its work in July, 2019. This committee will replace the Cooper Jones Bicycle Safety Advisory Committee and the Pedestrian Safety Advisory Committee, which were both set to wrap up work June 30, 2019. 

This is important work. Washington continues to see deaths for people walking and biking trend in the wrong direction; 2018 yet again saw an increase in deaths and serious injuries among Washington’s most vulnerable street users (see chart below).

Image: from the 2018 WSDOT Gray Book

Image: from the 2018 WSDOT Gray Book

In 2017, Washington Bikes partnered with Sen. Liias and Rep. Kloba in efforts to better understand the causes of serious injuries and deaths in Washington state and to find strategies to improve safety for those biking on Washington’s streets and roads. This led to the enactment of the Cooper Jones Bicyclist Safety Advisory Council. 

Until now, the pedestrian and bicyclist safety councils had been working independent from one another to identify weaknesses in the transportation system and submit annual reports to the legislature that include, among other things, policy reform recommendations. Those recommendations have already led to policy changes. One such example is the Vulnerable User/Safe Passing Law passed in Olympia this year, which the Cooper Jones Bicyclist Safety Advisory Council recommended to be updated last year. 

In addition to merging the two committees, the new Cooper Jones Active Transportation Safety Advisory Council (ATSAC) will continue meeting into perpetuity. The Cooper Jones ATSAC bill was introduced by the Washington Traffic Safety Commission, the agency that convenes the councils. The Cooper Jones ATSAC bill passed the Legislature with strong bipartisan support.

As with the prior committees, the Cooper Jones ATSAC will convene a panel of interdisciplinary professionals from law enforcement, multimodal transportation planners, public health representatives, municipalities, victim’s families, and active transportation advocates. The council will analyze bicyclist and pedestrian-involved collision data. This will be an opportunity to take a systemic look and gain a statewide understanding of what is taking place, where are the biggest weaknesses, and what solutions will curb the current, alarming trends. The council will submit an annual report to the legislature that includes recommendations for safety improvements.

Washington Bikes expects the recommendations of this panel to help inform and guide future policy and funding decisions made in Olympia and in cities, towns and counties across the state. Washington Bikes anticipates working with legislative and local leaders to change laws, and direct funding that will aggressively reduce deaths and serious injuries on our streets, and hold leaders accountable to both #TargetZero and #VisionZero. 

The legislation honors the heritage of The Cooper Jones Act of 1998 which set the foundation for bicycle safety legislation in Washington state. Named for 13-year-old Cooper Jones of Spokane, Wash., the Jones family worked relentlessly after the tragic loss of their son to strengthen safety laws for people who bike. Now, over 20 years later, Washington still has a lot of work ahead to make streets and roads safe for people who bike. The Cooper Jones Active Transportation Safety Advisory Committee aims to honor the work of the Jones’ family while making much needed transportation system safety improvements for those that bike, walk or roll. 

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The 2019 legislative session brought big wins for people who bike!

The 105-day legislative session adjourned on time Sunday April 28th, here’s what Washington Bikes accomplished

The 2019 legislative session was a fast-paced and intense 105 days, but we successfully  achieved Washington Bikes’ entire 2019 legislative agenda – ensuring investments in trails, sidewalks and bikeways, and establishing policies that improve safety for people who bike.

Before diving into the specifics of successes this session, it’s worth noting that this year was only the second time since 1980 that the legislature adjourned it’s “long session” (where the biennial budget is passed) on time.

With Democrats in control of the State House, Senate, and the Governor’s office, they worked to pass some unprecedented policy changes. But differences between the chambers on budget proposals – both what is funded, what revenue was viable to fund those proposals, and the position on some of the bills necessary to implement the budget – meant it wasn’t clear until the final minutes that they would actually adjourn on time.

Washington Bikes 2019 legislative agenda – here’s what happened!

Vulnerable user/Safe passing legislation

Washington Bikes led efforts to pass legislation to strengthen the rights of people bicycling, walking and other types of vulnerable roadway users. At its core, the Vulnerable user/Safe passing legislation does two things:

  • Increases the penalty for specific infractions involving people biking, walking, rolling, etc. (The increased fine will go towards education of law enforcement, the courts and the public regarding safe interactions with people who are vulnerable on the roadway. For more detail on what’s included in the new law, see here.)
  • Establishes a strengthened safe passing law (give a lane or provide at least three feet)

The vulnerable road user and safe passing bill passed the legislature with bipartisan support! The bill is awaiting signature by the Governor. Huge thanks to prime sponsors of the legislation Sen. Emily Randall (26th LD, Bremerton) and Rep. Christine Kilduff (28th LD, University Place) for their leadership and work throughout the session.

Growing investments in connected and safe infrastructure for people who bike & walk

Washington Bikes worked to secure funding for bicycling improvements, via the multimodal account and bike/pedestrian grant programs. The multimodal account dedicates funds for transportation for rail, ferries, transit, biking and walking. Multimodal account investments for biking and walking include the bicycle and pedestrian grant program and project list and the Safe Routes to School grant program.

Sen. Hobbs (44th LD, Lake Stevens) introduced a transportation revenue package which maintained the same level of investment for active transportation as the 2015 transportation revenue package and included a sales and use tax on new bicycles as part of the revenue proposal. The package did not move forward this year, but it did provide an opportunity to begin educating legislators as to why there is an even greater need for increased investment in active transportation and why taxing a form of transportation and recreation that we want more people to choose is counter intuitive.

The $41 million currently budgeted for SRTS and the bike and pedestrian grant program in the 2019-2021 biennium leaves over 200 applications unfunded statewide. These unfunded projects represent $146 million, close to half of the entire bike/ped and SRTS funding in the 2015 package at $306 million. Washington Bikes looks forward to continuing the work towards increased investments for people who bike in Washington’s next transportation revenue package.

Protecting and connecting trails statewide

Trails form a backbone of many of the biking and walking networks statewide. Washington Bikes, along with our trail advocate partners, worked to ensure the investments detailed below were secured for the development and maintenance of trails throughout Washington.

  • $5.7 million at the Department of Archaeology & Historic Preservation to protect and rehabilitate the Beverly Bridge a key connection along the Palouse to Cascades Trail. (Capital budget)
  • $85 million for the WWRP, which go towards improving outdoor recreation opportunities, trail development and enhancing state parks. The original ask was $180 million. (Capital budget)
  • Two additional projects along the Palouse to Cascades Trail are funded on the WWRP list. New this year is a requirement that a mediation process be convened to address ownership, development and use conflicts along the Palouse to Cascades Trail in Adams and Whitman counties in order for the Malden to Rosalia project funding to be released.

Support for the creation of the Active Transportation Safety Advisory Committee

Washington Bikes worked alongside active transportation advocates to pass legislation to merge the Cooper Jones Bicyclist Safety Advisory Committee and the Pedestrian Safety Advisory Committee forming the Active Transportation Safety Advisory Committee (ATSAC). The bill passed the legislature and has been signed into law! The ATSAC will be convened by Washington Traffic Safety Commission and comprised of stakeholders who have an expertise connected to bicycle and pedestrian street safety. The Council will analyze data related to bicycle and pedestrian fatalities and serious injuries and then identify vulnerabilities in the system and recommend improvements.

Of note, some legislators were supportive of including a sunset date for the ATSAC. But ultimately the bill was passed without a sunset date, so the work of the Council will be ongoing. An amendment by Sen. Sheldon (35th LD, Potlatch) was introduced while the bill was before the Senate Transportation committee, it is included in the final bill and strengthens the bill by requiring WTSC to also gather crash data on private property (i.e. in a parking lot) for consideration by the Council.

It was a productive legislative session. The team at Washington Bikes is thrilled we were able to help create safer streets, increase protections for people who bike, and connect and grow bicycle and trail networks throughout Washington state.

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A break down of what’s included in Washington Bikes’ 2019 priority legislation the Vulnerable Roadway User (VRU)/ Safe Passing bill

Wondering what SB 5723/HB 1966 actually mean for people biking and walking? Read on to see how the proposed legislation, if passed, will increase protections.

SB 5723, prime sponsored by Senator Randall (26th LD) passed the House Transportation committee last week and is headed to the Rules Committee. The bill is a step away from a vote on the full House floor.

Caption: SB 5723 Prime sponsor Sen. Randall speaking in support of the vulnerable road user bill on the Senate floor.

Caption: SB 5723 Prime sponsor Sen. Randall speaking in support of the vulnerable road user bill on the Senate floor.

Time and time again Washington Bikes has heard of failure to cite the state’s current VRU law, negligent driving in the second degree with a vulnerable roadway user. Whether that be for lack of awareness or ambiguity around when it should be cited, this new proposed legislation attempts to mitigate challenges in citing of an infraction involving a vulnerable roadway user. How will the bill do that? The proposed bill will make mandatory a fine increase for specific traffic infractions that are commonly dangerous for the most vulnerable people on Washington’s streets. Additionally, the bill clarifies “safe passing” laws. Read on for more specifics from the bill.

 

Caption: Rep. Kilduff, prime sponsor of HB 1966, speaking in support of the vulnerable road user bill.

Caption: Rep. Kilduff, prime sponsor of HB 1966, speaking in support of the vulnerable road user bill.

Who counts as a vulnerable roadway user?

A pedestrian, a person riding a bicycle, an electric-assisted bicycle; an electric personal assistive mobility device, moped, a motor-driven cycle, a motorized foot scooter, a motorcycle, a person riding an animal, a person operating a farm tractor or implement of husbandry without an enclosed shell.

What is safe passing?:

Current state law states, the driver of a vehicle overtaking other traffic proceeding in the same direction shall pass to the left of it at a safe distance and shall not again drive to the right side of the roadway until safely clear of the overtaken traffic.

Safe passing under the proposed law:

For people walking, bicycling, riding an animal or farm tractor without an enclosed shell the safe passing language is amended to direct a person passing to:

  • Two or more lanes of traffic: Give a lane. If there are two lanes of traffic traveling the same direction, a person must move completely into the lane to the left to pass the vulnerable user.
  • Single lane of traffic:
    • When there is sufficient room to the left of the vulnerable user reduce speed, pass at a safe distance, where practicable of at least three feet.
    • When there is insufficient room to the left of the vulnerable user in the lane for traffic moving in the direction of travel, before passing, move into the lane for traffic moving in the opposite direction when it is safe to do so.

The proposed legislation provides clarity for where a vulnerable roadway user should be expected on the roadway, where they should operate or walk if safe to do so. Vulnerable roadway users should operate or walk to the right side of the road way or in a shoulder or sidewalk if provided, safe or accessible. There are specific exceptions called out for people who bike, for example when taking a right hand turn from a right hand turn lane.

Strengthened penalties for specific traffic infractions:

The following traffic infractions have a high propensity for bad outcomes for people walking and biking. Under the proposed legislation, when law enforcement cites one of these traffic infractions involving a vulnerable roadway user there will now be a mandatory doubling of the base fine. The additional fine will be deposited into the newly created vulnerable roadway user education account.

Traffic infractions with a vulnerable roadway user:

  • Safe passing
  • Following too closely
  • Yield the right of way when entering an intersection from different highways
  • Yield the right of way when a driver is taking a left hand turn
  • Yield the right of way at a stop or yield sign
  • Yield the right of way when crossing a highway or private road

Creation of the vulnerable roadway user education account:

SB 5723 will create the vulnerable roadway user education account where the increased fines for the above specified traffic infractions will go to the Washington Traffic Safety Commission to be spent on programming that will educate law enforcement, judges, prosecutors and the public regarding vulnerable roadway users.

Please check back for updates and if you have any questions reach out to AlexA@wabikes.org.

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Announcing 2019 Active Transportation Lobby Day at the Washington Bike Summit

Event Announcement: Active Transportation Lobby Day

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Washington Bikes and Cascade Bicycle Club are partnering again for the Washington Bike Summit (February 11 and 12 in Olympia at Hotel RL). On Tuesday, Feb 12, we will hold our Active Transportation Lobby Day. It’s a chance to meet with your legislators and advocate for people walking and biking in Washington State.

Due to time and capacity constraints, we are only able to coordinate meetings for people who are also attending the Washington Bike Summit. You must sign up for the Active Transportation Lobby Day no later than January 31, and therefore you must register for the Washington Bike Summit no later than this date.

When you register, please select “Active Transportation Lobby Day” and we will follow up with an email with information about legislative meetings and volunteer lobby training.

Register now for the Washington Bike Summit, and pick from over 20 sessions about new mobility, including Open Streets, mobility justice, and ebikes!

 If you have already register for the Washington Bike Summit, but forgot to sign up for the lobby day, or if you have any other questions, please email MeganC@cascade.org before Thursday, January 31. 

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What to look for from Washington Bikes in the 2019 legislative session

Improved street safety, connecting and protecting trails, and growing investments in infrastructure for people who bike and walkIMG_2590

Washington Bikes is excited to be kicking off the 2019 legislative session in Olympia this week. This is the 105-day session or the “long session” which is the start of the biennium or two-year budget period.

In 2018’s “short session” Washington Bikes:

  • led efforts to update the statutory definition of bicycle to include e-bikes while ushering in a regulatory framework for the new technology
  • in partnership with Washington Trails Association secured funding for an economic and health benefits study for hiking, biking and walking (vendors are just beginning their work on the data gathering)
  • helped secure investments for maintenance and development of Washington’s trails
  • protected investments in the multimodal account which directly funds the Safe Routes to School and Bicycle and Pedestrian grant programs.

We accomplished all of that in 60 days! This year Washington Bikes is looking forward to again, helping to create healthy, active and thriving communities. We are also looking forward to having a bit more time to achieve the following legislative and budget priorities that will make a difference for people who bike.

Washington Bikes 2019 Legislative Agenda

Vulnerable road user/Safe passing legislation

Washington Bikes is working with Representative Kilduff (28thLD, University Place) on legislation to update Washington’s vulnerable roadway user (VRU) law. The VRU law update will provide clarity regarding when the VRU is applicable, strengthen the penalties, direct funds from VRU penalties toward education of the public, law enforcement and courts regarding the VRU law, and lastly, define a safe passing distance from people who are biking and walking.

Growing investments in connected and safe infrastructure for people who bike & walk

The multimodal transportation account dedicates funds for transportation for rail, ferries, transit, biking and walking, which are multimodal in nature. These investments include: the bicycle and pedestrian grant program, regional mobility grants and Safe Routes to School programs and projects. To ensure all Washingtonians – even those that cannot drive a car – can get around, Washington Bikes supports opportunities to grow the multimodal account and bike/pedestrian grant programs. Additionally, the limited multimodal dollars must remain dedicated to the purpose of providing transportation choices and solutions.

Protecting and connecting trails statewide

Trails form a backbone of many of the biking and walking networks statewide. Key project priorities include the development of the cross-state Palouse to Cascades Trail.

  • Support: $3.5 million in State Park’s and Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program (WWRP) funding requests to protect and further develop the Palouse to Cascades Trail. (Capital budget)
  • Support: $5.7 million in the Department of Archaeology & Historic Preservation’s funding request to protect and rehabilitate the Beverly Bridge a key connection along the Palouse to Cascades Trail. (Capital budget)
  • Support: $130 million WWRP funding request, including improving outdoor recreation opportunities, trail development and enhancing state parks. (Capital budget)

Support for the creation of the Active Transportation Safety Advisory Committee

The Cooper Jones Bicyclist Safety Advisory Committee and the Pedestrian Safety Advisory Committee will merge to form the Active Transportation Safety Advisory Committee (ATSAC). The ATSAC will be convened by Washington Traffic Safety Commission and comprised of stakeholders who have an expertise in bicycle and pedestrian street safety. The Council would analyze data related to bicycle and pedestrian fatalities and serious injuries and then identify vulnerabilities in the system and recommend improvements. This is agency request legislation.

Washington Bikes will be working hard over the next 103 days to help create safer streets, increase protections for people who bike, and connect and grow bicycle and trail networks throughout Washington. Stay in touch by signing up for Washington Bikes’ alerts!

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Welcome Gabe Meyer, new Policy Director for Washington Bikes

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Gabe Meyer is the new Policy Director for Cascade Bicycle Club and Washington Bikes. Gabe oversees all political advocacy efforts to shape public policy to make bicycling safer and more accessible for all. Based in Seattle, his team works on issues at the neighborhood, city, county, regional, and state levels in Washington State.

Before joining Washington Bikes, Gabe held numerous positions with non-profits and political campaigns, most recently as Finance Director for De-Escalate Washington’s Initiative 940 and as Campaign Manager for WAmend’s Initiative 735, before that. He has experience at the city, county, state, federal, and international levels of policy-making through positions at Not This Time, McGinn for Mayor, the King County Municipal League, Mike Honda for Congress, Seattle’s World Affairs Council, and the World Economic Forum in Switzerland, among others.

Gabe’s career has focused on constructing outcome-oriented teams and building organizational strength. He approaches his work through a social, racial, and environmental justice lens and sees many ways improved active transportation policy can better society and our world. Gabe is excited to bring these skills to build power for bike advocates with Cascade.

Gabe’s love for biking spans the areas of travel, recreation, and commuting. He once rode on his own from Phoenix to Tucson and looks forward to this year’s STP. Gabe often mountain bikes off I-90. And from first to third grade, Gabe biked to and from school every day.

Gabe was born in Seattle, raised in Southwest Washington, and graduated with a degree in  Political Science and Communications at Seattle Pacific University. He earned his Master’s Degree from Seton Hall University’s School of Diplomacy and International affairs, focusing on negotiations and economic development.

In his 20s, Gabe lived in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Jose, Geneva, Paris, and New York before returning to settle down in Seattle. He now lives in Capitol Hill with his wife Angela and their dog Poptart.

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Washington Bikes & Votes: Look for these bike-friendly candidates and ballot measures on your November ballot

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Washington Bikes announces 2018 general election endorsements

This year Washington Bikes endorsed legislators who led or partnered on efforts to create safer streets, increase accessibility to trails, improve healthy communities and health outcomes, and contribute to the economic vitality of Washington’s communities. Additionally, Washington Bikes has endorsed first time candidates who share our vision for lowering the barriers to bicycling for all ages and abilities.

Why do we make endorsements? Washington Bikes works to secure funding for bicycle infrastructure and policies that increase access and safety. To make that happen, it matters who Washington’s elected leaders are.

We’d like to thank all of the candidates, endorsed or otherwise, for taking the time to participate in Washington Bikes’ endorsement process.

Washington Bikes is pleased to announce endorsements for two ballot measures that will appear on November ballots: the SAFE Mobility Levy and I-1631.

  • The SAFE Mobility Levy on Bainbridge Island is a property tax levy that will raise city revenues for active transportation and recreation projects by about $2.2 million a year for seven years. If passed, the measure will yield investments in infrastructure improvements for people who bike and walk, including shoulder widening, bike lanes and trail projects with an emphasis on safe routes to school.
  • I-1631, the statewide clean air initiative will impose a $15 fee on each metric ton of carbon dioxide beginning in 2020 and increase $2 annually until the state achieves its emissions goals. The funds raised will invest in programs, activities and projects aimed at improving clean air, clean energy, healthy forests and healthy communities. If passed, I-1631 will invest in reducing vehicle miles traveled and increasing public transportation, non-motorized transportation and affordable transit-oriented housing. These efforts align with Washington Bikes’ goals around healthy communities, mode shift and thriving local economies.

The Washington Bikes endorsement speaks to thousands of engaged Washingtonians statewide who care about a range of issues. From wanting more connected trails, to safer neighborhood streets, to more opportunities for physical activity, Washingtonians are looking for leaders and policies that will advance these priorities.

2018 General Endorsements

*Download a PDF version of the endorsements list.

With less than six weeks until Election Day, we are in the final stretch! Are you ready to vote? Make sure you are registered to vote through the Washington Secretary of State’s office. If not, you still have a couple of days to register. Monday, October 8th is the deadline to register to vote in the November election. Curious what will appear on your November ballot? Check out your sample ballot at Ballotpedia. Lastly, Washington is a vote-by-mail state, so expect your ballot in the mail in roughly two weeks.

 

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