Bike It: USBR 10 – Methow Valley

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John Pope, WA Bikes board member and volunteer USBRS route coordinator, has put foot to pedal and is riding newly designated USBR 10. His wife Michele is providing vehicle support and chronicling the cross-state bike ride.

Toilet

Rustic camping.

We spent Day Three exploring the scenic Methow Valley. We left Early Winters Campground near Mazama and John pedaled past farms and ranches to Barn Bicycle Camping. Located midway between Mazama and Winthrop on Hwy 20/USBR 10, this stay-by-donation place for bike travelers is owned by Jan and Jim Gregg. It offers a solar shower, composting toilet and free wi-fi.

John’s next stop was Winthrop and the Methow Valley Cycle & Sport to stock up on bike tires (he had two blowouts on Day Two) and to thank them for their support of USBR 10.

Then it was on to Twisp and a great lunch at Cinnamon Twisp Bakery. Located at the confluence of the Twisp and Methow Rivers, this community has been an ardent supporter of USBR 10. The Methow Valley Inn hosted one of Washington Bikes’ early outreach meetings for this project.

Methow Valley Cycle - USBR 10

Cinnamon Twisp

From there things took a literal ‘turn’ for the worse. John continued on Hwy 20/USBR 10 to climb the 4020 ft summit of Loup Loup Pass while I managed to get turned around in a detour and took the scenic road along the Methow River into Pateros. I realized the error of my ways and turned around. The drive back to Twisp suddenly seemed longer, less scenic and much more twisty! After getting help at the construction site I headed over Loup Loup Pass and on to Okanogan — arriving at the same time as John! I offered to retire as his sag wagon but he declined my offer.

So Day Three was a day of lost and founds. Lost John’s helmet mirror and found it. Lost the bike pump and found it. I lost John and found him! All’s well that ends well!

Related Reading

Bike It: USBR 10 (Day One)
Bike It: USBR 10 – The Epic Climb (Day Two)
USBR 10, Northern Washington State

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2 Comments

  1. Mike
    Posted January 23, 2015 at 8:32 pm | Permalink

    Just read your comment re usbr10. Did you get an answer and did your route to spokane feel dangerous. I would like to traverse spokane to Seattle but not sure of routing. Any response appreciated.

  2. Mary
    Posted September 19, 2014 at 2:12 pm | Permalink

    Love the updates! I hope to be able to ride most if not all of the USBR 10! I rode along Highway 2 for the most part from Seattle to Spokane this summer but was able to stay in motels each night. Would you say that would be possible along the USBR 10?