Take the Poll: What Type of Rider Are You?

Interesting new research from McGill University in Montreal describes 4 types of riders, based on 2,000 people who responded to an online poll. Their categories include motivations for riding along with preferences for infrastructure. More and more research indicates the importance of safe, comfortable connected bike networks to get people to try bicycling; the numbers in this study seem to bear that out.

Which would you say comes closest to describing you? Ask your friends to take the poll too.

[socialpoll id=”14254″]

From the article:

Path-using cyclists (36 percent) are motivated by the fun of riding, its convenience, and the identity that cycling gives them. They’d rather use a continuous route, rather than dodge cars. They were actively encouraged by their parents to ride for fitness and to get places.

Dedicated cyclists (24 percent) are motivated by speed, predictability and flexibility that bike trips offer. These cyclists are the least likely to be deterred by the weather. They aren’t as interested in bike paths, and actually enjoy riding in traffic. The researchers say these cyclists consider riding to be an important part of their identity.

Fairweather utilitarians (23 percent) are just that. They like to ride in good weather, and they’ll take another form of transportation in rain or snow. These are also bike path users, and they don’t necessarily see themselves as cyclists.

Leisure cyclists (17 percent) ride because it is fun, and not as much for commuting. They prefer bike paths, don’t like to deal with traffic, and want to feel safe, especially when riding with family members.

For more on the study see Who’s Out There On The Roads? The 4 Types Of Cyclists in Forbes.

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5 Comments

  1. Barb Chamberlain
    Posted January 4, 2014 at 10:28 am | Permalink

    Love your motorist types, Leo!

  2. RickG
    Posted August 30, 2013 at 1:28 pm | Permalink

    Can’t say that I actually “enjoy” riding in traffic. I’m just glad to have developed the riding skills and competence to do so when necessary – which is most of the time when I’m riding. The “continuous route” just happens to include roads with traffic. Were I to try to ride only bike paths, I wouldn’t get very far – and since those bike paths are actually multi-use trails for bike riders and pedestrians, I wouldn’t go very fast.

  3. leo Stone
    Posted August 29, 2013 at 8:37 am | Permalink

    The 4 types of motorists:

    Freeway-using motorists (36 percent) are motivated by the fun of driving, its convenience, and the identity that driving gives them. They’d rather use a continuous route, rather than dodge bikes on conventional streets. They were actively encouraged by their parents to drive for status and to get places.

    Dedicated motorists (24 percent) are motivated by speed, predictability and flexibility that car trips offer. These motorists are the least likely to be deterred by the weather. They aren’t as interested in freeways, and actually enjoy driving in surface street traffic. The researchers say these motorists consider driving to be an important part of their identity.

    Fairweather utilitarians (23 percent) are just that. They like to drive in good weather, and they’ll take another form of transportation in rain or snow (usually the elderly bumming rides from their kids). These are also freeway users, and they don’t necessarily see themselves as drivers.

    Leisure drivers (17 percent) drive because it is fun, and not as much for commuting. They prefer freeways, don’t like to deal with city traffic, and want to feel safe, especially when driving with family members on the weekend.

  4. Chris Voges
    Posted August 28, 2013 at 3:24 pm | Permalink

    The 32 mi. long Centennial Trail is 3/4 mile away.

  5. CJ Voges
    Posted August 28, 2013 at 3:23 pm | Permalink

    The 35 mi. long Centennial Trail 3/4 mile away.